The Green Impact: How Renewable Sources Are Changing EU Electricity Prices

The European Union (EU) energy policy focuses on achieving a balance between three main pillars: increase the security of supply, reduce the impact of climate change, and improve economic competitiveness. To accomplish these objectives, the EU has been creating competitive conditions that internalize environmental externalities, and it has also actively promoted renewable energy.
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Harnessing the Full Potential of Clean Energy: The Role of Southern California’s Utility Distributed Energy Resource Pilots

California is committed to achieving carbon neutrality to reduce the threat of climate change by 2045. This will require deep decarbonization across all economic sectors and necessitate rigorous planning to keep energy safe, reliable, and affordable. Southern California Edison (SCE), a utility that delivers electricity to 15 million people across southern, central, and coastal California, undertook an in-depth analysis to identify a feasible and economical path to realizing California’s greenhouse gas reduction goals and achieve carbon neutrality at the lowest reasonable cost by 2045.
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Integrating Variable Renewables in Europe: Current Status and Recent Extreme Events

In recent months, energy policy in the European Union (EU) has started to focus on the concrete actions required to ensure the realization of a functioning internal energy market in the context of high levels of renewable energy in the post-2020 period. The most important developments include the agreement by the European Council on energy and climate targets for 2030 and the launch of the Energy Union by the European Commission in February 2015. European energy strategy will be strongly based on the development of variable renewables such as wind and PVs.
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On the Path to Decarbonization: Electrification and Renewables in California and the Northeast United States

Climate change threatens our quality of life and the habitability of planet Earth for many species. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that, to reduce the risk that global temperature increases more than 2 °C above preindustrial levels, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in developed countries must fall by approximately 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. A number of states and regions in the United States have committed to reducing long-term GHG emissions by this level, including California, New York, and New England.
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Powerlines and Wildfires: Overview, Perspectives, and Climate Change: Could There Be More Electricity Blackouts in the Future?

Overhead powerlines cross extensive areas of forest and grasslands, and these areas are often flammable and can burn. Wildfire is a natural phenomenon important to many ecosystems around the globe, but also capable of considerable damage to people and communities. As a result of human activity in natural spaces, people have altered wildfire regimes over time, and wildfires have become a threat to people, to their property, and infrastructure.
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Electrification in the United Kingdom: A Case Study Based on Future Energy Scenarios

For the United Kingdom, one of the main drivers for a green ambition is the Climate Change Act of 2008. This forms the basis for the country’s approach to responding to climate change and legally commits the U.K. government to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. This level of commitment to reducing emissions was further confirmed in the Paris Agreement, the aim of which is to hold the increase in global average temperature to well below 2 °C above preindustrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit warming to 1.5 °C.
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